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Basic Needs News

Study Concludes Colorado River Reservoirs Could Bottom Out from Warming, Water Management Business-as-Usual
Monday, July 20 2009
Nation
A study out of University of Colorado, Boulder, indicates that there could be about a 50% chance of depleting the Colorado River reservoirs in any given year by the 2050s. These reservoirs have the potential to hold 4 times the annual flow of the river, providing a major backup in case of drought or increasing demand that rises above what the river can provide. However, as a result of climate change and increasing demand, if water management practices are not changed, every year could see a 50-50 chance of depleting these reservoirs and being forced to rely on the river flow alone. This would be dangerous because the natural flow of the river is variable and also may soon be inadequate to meet water demand.
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Crop plants get genomics centre
Friday, June 26 2009
Global
Britain's biotechnology research council the BBSRC plans to open a research center that will decode the DNA of plants and animals used in agriculture better understand the genetic diversity of these crops, to increase yields, resist pests, and deal with climate change.
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Jungle residents protest development of Amazon rainforest
Friday, June 05 2009
Nation
Last year, Peruvian president Alan Garcia signed a series of laws vastly decreasing forest protection, opening up 111 million acres for potential development. The laws also authorize the government to approve development projects in the region without consulting existing residents. These and other laws essentially nationalize the ownership of much land, water and oil, in addition to other resources. Meanwhile, they push for formal, private ownership of agricultural land, which is incompatible with current communal systems and may reduce agricultural sustainability at a national level. As various jungle oil concessions were granted in April, Amazonian residents instituted a months-long road-block in protest of these laws, blocking oil lines and leading to a spike in oil prices in the capital. A State of Emergency was declared, allowing police to break the road block with violent measures on Friday, June 5. A reported 60 were killed that day, although some say the numbers are higher. Facing widespread popular resistance, the government temporarily suspended the laws on June 10. Protests continue throughout the country.
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Bartender helps turn wine to water in developing world
Friday, May 01 2009
Global Career
Story a bartender from North Carolina that raised money through wine tasting events to fund clean water projects around the world. He then not only raised the money for the projects, but worked himself on installing clean water infrastructure in 5 countries.
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Dry Taps in Mexico City: A Water Crisis Gets Worse
Saturday, April 11 2009
Nation
The Mexican government is needing to ship in water by truck to try to meet the demand of Mexico City, and outages affecting up to a quarter of the city have been seen.
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Fighting hunger with flood-tolerant rice
Thursday, February 05 2009
Global
Scientists have been working on producing more flood tolerant varieties of rice in order to lower the loses in rice harvest that occur every year due to flooding conditions.
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Heat may spark world food crisis
Friday, January 09 2009
Global
Half the world's population could face a climate-induced food crisis by 2100, a new report by US scientists warns. This article describes the problems climate change poses for our staple food crops and debunks the myth that we can just move crops north as the world warms.
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Plenty more fish in the sea? No longer
Tuesday, December 30 2008
Global
Fisherman world-wide are catching fewer, smaller fish. It is predicted that if things continue as they are, none of the fishes consumed by humans may remain viable in the wild.
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